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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder clinical trials at UCLA

13 in progress, 8 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Responsive Neurostimulation for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    open to eligible males ages 25-60

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) refractory to treatment is marked by failure of fear extinction and its biological substrate, amygdala reactivity to trauma reminders. Decades of research have clarified the neuronal mechanisms coordinating fear extinction and consolidation. Fear cells and extinction cells in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) alter their firing rate based on the nature of the stimulus and the influence from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventral hippocampus (vHPC). Together, the BLA, mPFC, and the vHPC form an anxiety-processing network where the BLA links stimulus to emotion, the vHPC provides memory context, and the mPFC coordinates extinction or consolidation. Local field potential (LFP) recordings from the BLA have revealed specific signals that correspond to an enhanced fear state. Previous studies have shown that neuromodulation of the BLA can promote extinction in a rodent model and in a treatment-refractory PTSD patient. This action is likely carried by disrupting fear signals within the BLA; however, continuous neurostimulation may also disrupt normal function of the amygdala. The present application proposes to investigate the use of Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS, Neuropace) in six (6) veterans suffering from severe treatment-resistant PTSD. This dual-activity device will allow us to chronically record LFPs from the BLA under specific conditions such as fear conditioning, exposure to trauma reminders, and emotional memory encoding and retrieval. In addition, the neural activity will be captured during real-life symptoms of flashback and nightmares. These recordings will provide the specific electrophysiological biomarkers of hypervigilance and re-experiencing. The device will then be programmed to detect and treat these biomarkers with a pre-determined electrical pulse. The patients will be followed prospectively using psychological scales but also with functional neuroimaging and electroencephalograms. These modalities will be used to determine the extent of circuit engagement as a result of the therapy. By approaching PTSD from a fear processing mechanism perspective, our project will serve as a proof of concept for other circuit-based therapies in psychiatry. This proposal is a multi-departmental effort involving 11 investigators across 7 departments and requires a close collaboration between clinical and basic scientists. As a result, the findings underlying chronic recordings will bridge the basic science results from fear conditioning research to clinical neural processes in PTSD patients.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Key Dimensions of PTSD and ED

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will test whether endothelial dysfunction could be the early subclinical mechanism by which posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and whether posttraumatic fear-a key component of PTSD-or another PTSD dimension could be the target to offset that risk. The results of this study may help trauma-exposed individuals who are at risk of having CVD events.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Adaptation of the PCIP for Children Aged 6 to 11

    open to eligible people ages 6-11

    This study will implement a brief Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) intervention for children, the Primary Care Intervention for PTSD (PCIP) delivered through telehealth (computer or smartphone delivery), to 10 youth age 6-11 and their caregivers. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) randomized pilot feasibility trial (n=10 to treatment and 10 to waitlist control) to refine the intervention, study procedures, and explore effectiveness. Following RE-AIM guidelines, the investigators will assess: 1. Reach: patient participation in intervention delivery (out of all those asked to participate) and retention rate (out of all those who consented to participate and completed at least two intervention sessions) 2. Adoption: patients and their parents/guardians will complete screening and intervention satisfaction ratings. To understand patient experiences with the intervention and to identify and explain positive or negative treatment mechanisms or effects, the investigators will conduct post-intervention semi-structured interviews with the participating patients, their parents/guardians, and with providers. This treatment ranges from 1-4 sessions which last 50 minutes per session. The first session will cover psychoeducation about PTSD symptoms in children that can be delivered to the parent or both the parent and child. The first session will also teach the parent and child a breathing technique to combat the physiological impact of PTSD in children. The subsequent sessions will be tailored to meet the needs of the child's most distressing PTSD symptom cluster including hyper arousal, negative changes in cognition and mood, avoidance, re-experiencing. Each session contains coping skills that the parent and child can learn together. There is also material for parents to address behavior problems in youth. This treatment will be delivered via telehealth.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Adolescent PCIP Randomized Feasibility Trial

    open to eligible people ages 12-22

    There are three research questions: (1) whether the Primary Care Intervention for PTSD (PCIP) improves health outcomes; (2) whether and how the PCIP can be sustainably delivered via telehealth; and (3) how PCIP compares to treatment as usual (TAU) participants. The mixed methods randomized feasibility trial of the protocol will be measured by the RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) (n=44 patients and their care givers). We will collect data on patient, caregiver, and clinic staff participation, retention, and satisfaction (Reach and Adoption), change in hypothesized treatment mechanisms and symptoms (Effectiveness), and facilitators and barriers to intervention delivery and fidelity (Implementation). We will, 1. Assess the reach and adoption of the protocol by analyzing quantitative data on patient and clinic staff participation, retention, and satisfaction; 2. Explore the effectiveness of the protocol through medical record review, quantitative assessments at baseline and post-treatment, and semi-structured qualitative interviews at baseline and post-treatment to: 3. Evaluate the implementation of the screening and intervention protocol with post-intervention semi-structured qualitative interviews to assess facilitators and barriers to intervention delivery, quantitative fidelity scales, observation of screening, and review of intervention audio recordings to assess fidelity to the protocol and intervention process.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Biomolecular Characteristics of Reminder-Focused Positive-Psychiatry

    open to eligible people ages 11-15

    Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder in children and is associated with increased neurovascular inflammation, suicidality, adulthood mental health disorder, and major adverse events. Reminder focused positive psychiatry (RFPP) has been shown as well tolerated feasible trauma focused intervention that is associated with improved core PTSD symptoms, decreased severity of reactivity to PTSD trauma reminders, and increased vascular function. This study evaluates the clinical and biomolecular characteristics of RFPP in adolescents with PTSD. Research Design/Overall Impact: After obtaining parents' informed consent and adolescent's assent, 60 adolescents aged 11-15 years old with PTSD, and free of known medical and other major psychiatric disorders will be recruited from the pool of eligible adolescents at Olive View UCLA Pediatrics Clinics (>3000 adolescents with PTSD). Eligible adolescents will be randomized to 1) RFPP group intervention, or 2) an attentional control condition (group process). Thirty subjects in each group will receive twice weekly telehealth intervention of either RFPP or group process, for 6 weeks, and undergo 4 blinded neuropsychiatric assessments at baseline, 3, 6, and 24 weeks. Parents will receive weekly interventions of either positive psychoeducation or group process, for 6 weeks and undergo baseline, 3, 6- and 24-weeks neuropsychiatric assessment. Vascular function, inflammatory biomarkers including CRP, homocysteine, and stress involved gene expression biomarkers (i.e. changes in gene expression of FKBP5, DDX6, B2M, LAIR1, RTN4, NUB1, and a multi-gene Conserved Transcriptional Response to Adversity score (CTRA) will be measured at baseline and 6-week. The primary and secondary endpoints are a) changes in PTSD core and reactivity to trauma reminder severity score in response to RFPP intervention, b) changes in wellbeing, biopsychosocial trait, vascular function, neuroinflammation and gene expression biomarkers in response to RFPP, and c) changes in parents' wellbeing and biopsychosocial trait as well as child-parent interactions.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Deep Brain Stimulation of the Amygdala for Combat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    open to eligible males ages 25-70

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects approximately 30 % of American veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Although the current therapy is effective, a percentage of patients will fail to improve and will develop chronic treatment-resistant PTSD. Patients suffering from PTSD experience intense suffering, lack of productivity and a higher risk of suicide. Unfortunately, combat PTSD has a tendency to be resistant to current treatments. The central goal of this project is to develop a new therapeutic strategy involving the placement of intracranial electrodes to treat the symptoms of PTSD. The project is based on recent evidence showing abnormal activity in a specific brain region of PTSD patients, thought to be responsible for the core symptoms of PTSD.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Insomnia Treatment and Cardiometabolic Health in Older Adults With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 50 years and up

    This pilot randomized controlled trial will address a gap in knowledge related to addressing modifiable risk factors for cardiometabolic disease through treating residual insomnia, sleep difficulties that remain after successful treatment of another condition, in the context of PTSD in understudied older adults. This study provides a non-medication treatment for PTSD called Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) followed by one of two non-medication sleep education and treatment programs for sleep problems that remain after completing PTSD treatment in older adults with PTSD. The aims of this project are to evaluate 1) the added benefits of treating residual insomnia on sleep and PTSD symptoms; 2) the added benefits of treating residual insomnia following CPT on cardiometabolic risk biomarkers and quality of life; and 3) the durability of the sleep, PTSD, cardiometabolic and quality of life benefits of treating residual insomnia following CPT at 6-month follow-up in older adults with PTSD.

    North Hills, California

  • Intracranial Neurophysiological Signatures of Fear and Anxiety in Humans

    open to eligible people ages 18-90

    Anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) affect a large number of individuals with a significant portion of patients failing to improve with current treatments. The purpose of this study is to understand the brain mechanisms that produce fear and anxiety in humans. To accomplish this goal, we will measure the brain activity along with the heart rate and skin perspiration of patients while they are completing tasks on a computer. Some of the tasks will also use a virtual reality headset and transport the patient in a video game-like environment. These tasks will expose the participants to various levels of fear-provoking images.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Adaptation of the PCIP for Spanish Speaking Adolescents and Families

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study will implement a brief Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) intervention for children, the Primary Care Intervention for PTSD (PCIP) delivered through telehealth (computer or smart phone delivery), to 10 Spanish speaking youth and their families. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) randomized pilot feasibility trial (n=10 to treatment and 10 to waitlist control) to refine the intervention, study procedures, and explore effectiveness. Following RE-AIM guidelines, the investigators will assess: Reach: patient participation in intervention delivery (out of all those asked to participate) and retention rate (out of all those who consented to participate and completed at least two intervention sessions) Adoption: patients and their parents/guardians will complete screening and intervention satisfaction ratings. To understand patient experiences with the intervention and to identify and explain positive or negative treatment mechanisms or effects, the investigators will conduct post-intervention semi-structured interviews with the participating patients, their parents/guardians, and with providers. This treatment ranges from 1-3 sessions which last 30-50 minutes per session. The first session will cover psychoeducation about PTSD symptoms in children that can be delivered to the parent or both the parent and child. The first session will also teach the parent and child a breathing technique to combat the physiological impact of PTSD in children. The subsequent sessions will be tailored to meet the needs of the child's most distressing PTSD symptom cluster including hyper arousal, negative changes in cognition and mood, avoidance, re-experiencing. Each session contains coping skills that the parent and child can learn together. There is also material for parents to address behavior problems in youth. This treatment will be delivered via telehealth. All treatment materials have been developed in both Spanish and English.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery From Other Stresses

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery from Other Stresses (CLARO) is a five-year project that tests whether delivering care using a collaborative model helps patients with both opioid use disorders and mental health disorders.

    Santa Monica, California and other locations

  • Competitive Revision for CLARO: Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery From Other Stresses

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to develop and then test an enhanced version of the parent study's collaborative care intervention for co-occurring disorders (CC-COD) to reduce the risk of suicide and overdose among individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) in combination with PTSD/depression. The parent study is CLARO, Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery from Other Stresses (NCT04559893).

    Santa Monica, California and other locations

  • MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for Treatment Resistant PTSD in Adolescents

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The primary objective of this study is to determine the safety and feasibility of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) -assisted psychotherapy to treat resistant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The secondary objectives are the exploration of effectiveness for treatment-resistant PTSD, symptoms of depression, and anxiety symptoms.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Personalized Brain Stimulation to Treat Chronic Concussive Symptoms

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The goal of this study is to investigate a new treatment for chronic symptoms after concussion or mild traumatic brain injury in people aged 18-65 years old. Chronic symptoms could include dizziness, headache, fatigue, brain fog, memory difficulty, sleep disruption, irritability, or anxiety that occurred or worsened after the injury. These symptoms can interfere with daily functioning, causing difficulty returning to physical activity, work, or school. Previous concussion therapies have not been personalized nor involved direct treatments to the brain itself. The treatment being tested in the present study is a noninvasive, personalized form of brain stimulation, called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The investigators intend to answer the questions: 1. Does personalized TMS improve brain connectivity after concussion? 2. Does personalized TMS improve avoidance behaviors and chronic concussive symptoms? 3. Do the improvements last up to 2 months post-treatment? 4. Are there predictors of treatment response, or who might respond the best? Participants will undergo 14 total visits to University of California Los Angeles (UCLA): 1. One for the baseline symptom assessments and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 2. Ten for TMS administration 3. Three for post-treatment symptom assessments and MRIs Participants will have a 66% chance of being assigned to an active TMS group and 33% chance of being assigned to a sham, or inactive, TMS group. The difference is that the active TMS is more likely to cause functional changes in the brain than the inactive TMS.

    Westwood, California

Our lead scientists for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder research studies include .

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