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Anemia clinical trials at UCLA

22 in progress, 12 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Gene Transfer Study Inducing Fetal Hemoglobin in Sickle Cell Disease (GRASP, BMT CTN 2001)

    open to eligible people ages 13-40

    A promising approach for the treatment of genetic diseases is called gene therapy. Gene therapy is a relatively new field of medicine in which genetic material (mostly DNA) in the patient is changed to treat his or her own disease. In gene therapy, we introduce new genetic material in order to fix or replace the patient's disease gene, with the goal of curing the disease. The procedure is similar to a bone marrow transplant, in that the patient's malfunctioning blood stem cells are reduced or eliminated using chemotherapy, but it is different because instead of using a different person's (donor) blood stem cells for the transplant, the patient's own blood stem cells are given back after the new genetic material has been introduced into those cells. This approach has the advantage of eliminating any risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD), reducing the risk of graft rejection, and may also allow less chemotherapy to be utilized for the conditioning portion of the transplant procedure. To introduce new genetic material into the patient's own blood stem cells we use a modified version of a virus (called a 'vector') that efficiently inserts the "correcting" genetic material into the cells. The vector is a specialized biological medicine that has been formulated for use in human beings. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is a healthy, non-sickling kind of hemoglobin. The investigators have discovered a gene that is very important in controlling the amount of HbF. Decreasing the expression of this gene in sickle cell patients could increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin while simultaneously reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in their blood, specifically the amount in red blood cells where sickle hemoglobin causes damage to the cell, and therefore potentially cure or significantly improve the condition. The gene we are targeting for change in this study that controls the level of fetal hemoglobin is called BCL11A. In summary, the advantages of a gene therapy approach include: 1) it can be used even if the patient does not have a matched donor available; 2) it may allow a reduction in the amount of chemotherapy required to prepare the patient for the transplant; and 3) it will avoid certain strong medicines often required to prevent and treat GVHD and rejection. Our lab studies with normal mice, mice that have a form of SCD, and with cells from the bone marrow of SCD patients who have donated bone marrow for research purposes show this approach is very effective in reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in red cells. Our pilot trial testing this approach in 10 patients with SCD has shown that the treatment has not caused any unexpected safety problems, and that it increases HbF within the red blood cells. Our goal is to continue to test whether this approach is safe, and whether using gene therapy to change the expression of BCL11A will lead to decreased episodes of vaso-occlusive crisis pain in people with SCD.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Mitapivat (AG-348) in Participants With Sickle Cell Disease (RISE UP)

    open to eligible people ages 16 years and up

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2/3 study that will determine the recommended dose of mitapivat and evaluate the efficacy and safety of mitapivat in sickle cell disease by testing how well mitapivat works compared to placebo to increase the amount of hemoglobin in the blood and to reduce or prevent the occurrence of sickle cell pain crises. In addition, the long-term effect of mitapivat on efficacy and safety will be explored in an open-label extension portion.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Obexelimab in Patients With Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (SApHiAre)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study aims to examine the efficacy and safety of obexelimab in participants with Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA).

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Luspatercept (ACE-536) Versus Placebo in Subjects With Myeloproliferative Neoplasm-Associated Myelofibrosis on Concomitant JAK2 Inhibitor Therapy and Who Require Red Blood Cell Transfusions

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this Phase 3 study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Luspatercept compared with placebo in subjects with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN)-associated Myelofibrosis (MF) and anemia on concomitant Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibitor therapy and who require red blood cell count (RBC) transfusions. The study is divided into Screening Period, a Treatment Phase (consisting of a Blinded Core Treatment Period, a Day 169 Response Assessment, a Blinded Extension Treatment Period, and an Open-label Extension Treatment Period), and a Posttreatment Follow-up Period. Following the Day 169 Response Assessment, subjects who did not show clinical benefit will have the option to unblind. Subjects who were on placebo during the Blinded Core Treatment Period will have the opportunity to crossover into the Open-Label Extension Treatment Period and receive Luspatercept.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Pazopanib on Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Related Epistaxis and Anemia (Paz)

    open to eligible people ages 18-85

    During the Efficacy Study (Part B), the investigators will study whether Pazopanib, taken daily for 24 weeks, will reduce the severity of nose bleeds in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Patients will either be provided active drug or a placebo [sugar - inactive pill], and be tested for nose bleed severity throughout the trial, including particularly nose bleed duration. Investigators will also test for blood loss, as well as for safety. This study is funded by the US Department of Defense USAMRAA and FDA/OOPD.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Etavopivat in Patients With Thalassemia or Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 12-65

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2 study that will evaluate the safety and clinical activity of etavopivat in patients with thalassemia or sickle cell disease and test how well etavopivat works to lower the number of red blood cell transfusions required and increase hemoglobin.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Oral GSK4172239D Compared With Placebo in Sickle Cell Disease Participants Aged 18 to 50 Years

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    This will be a first time in human (FTIH) study in sickle cell diseases (SCD) participants. The FTIH study is planned to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of GSK4172239D. The study will be composed of 3 periods for all participants (Screening, Treatment, and Follow up). Participants will be screened and, prior to first dose on Day 1, will be randomized to receive either GSK4172239D or placebo. GSK4172239D is a prodrug that is converted in vivo into GSK4106401. This study will be a single dose, dose-escalation study. The initial dosing for all cohorts will be staggered so that 2 participants will be dosed as sentinel participants. Provided there are no safety concerns in 48 hours (h), the remaining 6 participants scheduled for the cohort may be dosed. One selected cohort of participants will also receive an additional single dose of GSK4172239D (or matching placebo) under fed (high calorie and high fat) conditions after a washout period of a minimum of 20 days or 5 half-lives, whichever is longer, designated as the Food Effect Cohort.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Comparing Unrelated Donor BMT With IST for Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Severe Aplastic Anemia (TransIT, BMT CTN 2202)

    open to eligible people ages 0-25

    Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA) is a rare condition in which the body stops producing enough new blood cells. SAA can be cured with immune suppressive therapy or a bone marrow transplant. Regular treatment for patients with aplastic anemia who have a matched sibling (brother or sister), or family donor is a bone marrow transplant. Patients without a matched family donor normally are treated with immune suppressive therapy (IST). Match unrelated donor (URD) bone marrow transplant (BMT) is used as a secondary treatment in patients who did not get better with IST, had their disease come back, or a new worse disease replaced it (like leukemia). This trial will compare time from randomization to failure of treatment or death from any cause of IST versus URD BMT when used as initial therapy to treat SAA. The trial will also assess whether health-related quality of life and early markers of fertility differ between those randomized to URD BMT or IST, as well as assess the presence of marrow failure-related genes and presence of gene mutations associated with MDS or leukemia and the change in gene signatures after treatment in both study arms. This study treatment does not include any investigational drugs. The medicines and procedures in this study are standard for treatment of SAA.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Myeloablative Conditioning, Prophylactic Defibrotide and Haplo AlloSCT for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 34 years

    This is a follow-up trial to NYMC 526 (NCT01461837) to assess the safety, efficacy and toxicity of administering Defibrotide prophylaxis for high-risk sickle cell or beta thalassemia patients undergoing a familial haploidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantation with CD34 enrichment and T-cell addback. This patient population historically has a risk of developing sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) and Defibrotide has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of SOS. The Funding Source is FDA OOPD.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Research Study Investigating How Well NDec Works in People With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study examines how well a new, potential medicine called NDec works and is tolerated in people with sickle cell disease. NDec is a combination of two medicines (decitabine-tetrahydrouridine). Both medicines are new for the treatment of sickle cell disease. Participants who are not taking Hydroxyurea (HU) will get NDec, NDec and placebo, or placebo. Participants who are on HU treatment before joining the study will get NDec, NDec and placebo, or continue on HU. Which treatment participants get is decided by chance. Participants getting NDec and/or Placebo will get capsules to take twice weekly. The study will last for about a year.

    Torrance, California and other locations

  • ATHN Transcends: A Natural History Study of Non-Neoplastic Hematologic Disorders

    open to all eligible people

    In parallel with the growth of American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network's (ATHN) clinical studies, the number of new therapies for all congenital and acquired hematologic conditions, not just those for bleeding and clotting disorders, is increasing significantly. Some of the recently FDA-approved therapies for congenital and acquired hematologic conditions have yet to demonstrate long-term safety and effectiveness beyond the pivotal trials that led to their approval. In addition, results from well-controlled, pivotal studies often cannot be replicated once a therapy has been approved for general use.(1,2,3,4) In 2019 alone, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued approvals for twenty-four new therapies for congenital and acquired hematologic conditions.(5) In addition, almost 10,000 new studies for hematologic diseases are currently registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov.(6) With this increase in potential new therapies on the horizon, it is imperative that clinicians and clinical researchers in the field of non-neoplastic hematology have a uniform, secure, unbiased, and enduring method to collect long-term safety and efficacy data. ATHN Transcends is a cohort study to determine the safety, effectiveness, and practice of therapies used in the treatment of participants with congenital or acquired non-neoplastic blood disorders and connective tissue disorders with bleeding tendency. The study consists of 7 cohorts with additional study "arms" and "modules" branching off from the cohorts. The overarching objective of this longitudinal, observational study is to characterize the safety, effectiveness and practice of treatments for all people with congenital and acquired hematologic disorders in the US. As emphasized in a recently published review, accurate, uniform and quality national data collection is critical in clinical research, particularly for longitudinal cohort studies covering a lifetime of biologic risk.(7)

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Haplo T-Cell Depleted Transplantation in High-Risk Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is being done to determine the safety and outcome (long-term control) of a high-dose chemotherapy regimen followed by an infusion of CD34 selected (immune cells) stem cells from a partially matched adult family member donor, called haploidentical stem cell transplantation, in high-risk sickle cell disease patients. Funding Source - FDA OOPD

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Phase I clinical trial will assess the safety and initial evidence for efficacy of an autologous transplant of lentiviral vector modified peripheral blood for adults with severe sickle cell disease.

    Los Angeles, California

  • Adult and Pediatric Participants With SCD

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of osivelotor.

    Torrance, California and other locations

  • Fostamatinib Disodium in the Treatment of Warm Antibody Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The primary objective of this study is: • To evaluate the long-term safety of fostamatinib in subjects with warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA).

    Torrance, California and other locations

  • AG-946 in Participants With Anemia Due to Lower-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (LR-MDS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This purpose of this study is to establish proof of concept of AG-946 in participants with LR-MDS in Phase 2a and to compare the effect of AG-946 versus placebo and to detect a dose response for erythroid response in participants with LR-MDS in Phase 2b.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Gene Transfer for Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    A promising approach for the treatment of genetic diseases is called gene therapy. Gene therapy is a relatively new field of medicine that uses genetic material (mostly DNA) from the patient to treat his or her own disease. In gene therapy, the investigators introduce new genetic material in order to fix or replace the patient's disease gene, with the goal of curing the disease. The procedure is similar to a bone marrow transplant, in that the patient's malfunctioning blood stem cells are reduced or eliminated using chemotherapy, but it is different because instead of using a different person's (donor) blood stem cells for the transplant, the patient's own blood stem cells are given back after the new genetic material has been introduced into those cells. This approach has the advantage of eliminating any risk of GVHD, reducing the risk of graft rejection, and may also allow less chemotherapy to be utilized for the conditioning portion of the transplant procedure. The method used to introduce the gene into the patient's own blood stem cells is to engineer and use a modified version of a virus (called a 'vector') that efficiently inserts the "correcting" genetic material into the cells. The vector is a specialized biological medicine that has been formulated for use in human beings. The investigators have recently discovered a gene that is very important in the control of fetal hemoglobin expression. Increasing the expression of this gene in sickle cell patients could increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin while simultaneously reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in their blood, and therefore potentially cure the condition. In summary, the advantages of a gene therapy approach include: 1) it can be used even if the patient does not have a matched donor available; 2) it may allow a reduction in the amount of chemotherapy required to prepare the patient for the transplant; and 3) it will avoid the strong medicines often required to prevent and treat GVHD and rejection. The goal is to test whether this approach is safe, and whether using gene therapy to change the expression of this particular gene will lead to increased fetal hemoglobin production in people with sickle cell disease.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA)

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a trial with an observational and an interventional arm, in patients with moderate to severe anemia and control subjects. The main purposes of this study is to phenotype the scope of neurocognitive deficits from iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in adult women, determine derangements in cerebral perfusion, vascular reactivity, functional connectivity, and blood brain barrier permeability in adult-onset IDA and relate them to neurocognitive deficits, as well as determine the reversibility and durability of both the physiologic and neurocognitive derangements by iron replacement therapy. All eligible subjects will be asked to provide informed consent before participating in the study.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • INTERCEPT Blood System for RBCs in Complex Cardiac Surgery Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RBC transfusion for support of acute anemia in cardiovascular surgery patients based on the clinical outcome of renal impairment following transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) treated with the INTERCEPT Blood System (IBS) for Red Blood Cells compared to patients transfused with conventional RBCs.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Transfusion of Prematures Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of the TOP trial is to determine whether higher hemoglobin thresholds for transfusing ELBW infants resulting in higher hemoglobin levels lead to improvement in the primary outcome of survival and rates of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) at 22-26 months of age, using standardized assessments by Bayley.

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

  • Transplantation of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Modified Hematopoietic Progenitor Stem Cells (CRISPR_SCD001) in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is an open label, non-randomized, 2-center, phase 1/2 trial of a single infusion of sickle allele modified cluster of differentiation (CD34+) hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) in subjects with in subjects ≥12 years old to 35 years old severe Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). The study will evaluate the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using CRISPR/Cas9 edited red blood cells (known as CRISPR_SCD001 Drug Product).

    Los Angeles, California and other locations

Our lead scientists for Anemia research studies include .

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